Mystery of the Missing Meng

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raptor_girl
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby raptor_girl » Fri Jan 01, 2016 3:10 pm

This story is absolutely crazy! There are some total assholes in the world!

Our address is almost identical to someone elses (who lives 10 minutes walk away + we have no car) and we get their mail A LOT and we always walk down to return it. I could never dream of opening it. Sometimes I open letters that arrive for old tenants just to see if we should chase it up to return to them or not waste their time.

Have you considered asking the guy who bought it for it back?
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby mynickname » Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:41 pm

HornyUnicorn wrote:Who brags about selling stuff they stole? CRACKHEADS
I haven't read this entire topic, but I'd like to point out that keeping something accidentally sent to you isn't stealing. It's considered a free gift to you. There was a law specifically about this to stop companies from 'accidentally' sending you things you didn't order then demanding you pay for them or pay return fees. It's not morally correct to keep it when you can redirect it to it's proper place, but it isn't illegal, and for a decent reason.
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby kittycat1356 » Thu Jan 07, 2016 11:24 pm

mynickname wrote:
HornyUnicorn wrote:Who brags about selling stuff they stole? CRACKHEADS
I haven't read this entire topic, but I'd like to point out that keeping something accidentally sent to you isn't stealing. It's considered a free gift to you. There was a law specifically about this to stop companies from 'accidentally' sending you things you didn't order then demanding you pay for them or pay return fees. It's not morally correct to keep it when you can redirect it to it's proper place, but it isn't illegal, and for a decent reason.


The reason it's technically illegal in this case is because it was given to the wrong address :stick: and then opened, and kept, and sold, knowingly that it wasn't theirs.

Now, at my current residence we receive mail for someone who doesn't live here anymore, we throw it out or give it to people who need the stuff ( like weird tubes for oxygen tanks)
I think the lady died :psyduck:
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karla-chan
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby karla-chan » Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:17 am

In the UK it's illegal to open a package that isn't addressed to you, so doesn't the US have a similar law?
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LurkingWolf
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby LurkingWolf » Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:47 am

karla-chan wrote:In the UK it's illegal to open a package that isn't addressed to you, so doesn't the US have a similar law?


If I understand correctly, it is illegal in the US to open someone else's USPS mail intentionally, but we have a loophole that allows it not to be a crime if something was accidentally delivered to you and you opened it without realizing it wasn't for you (I mean that definitely sounds fake but ok). It IS against the law to interfere with the delivery of that mail by not resealing it and returning it to a post office or postal carrier once you see it's not for you.

The opening-a-package laws don't seem to apply to private couriers at all, but it is still considered theft to keep the contents of a package not addressed to you--it's still a crime, just not the same crime.
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karla-chan
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby karla-chan » Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:58 am

LurkingWolf wrote:
karla-chan wrote:In the UK it's illegal to open a package that isn't addressed to you, so doesn't the US have a similar law?


If I understand correctly, it is illegal in the US to open someone else's USPS mail intentionally, but we have a loophole that allows it not to be a crime if something was accidentally delivered to you and you opened it without realizing it wasn't for you (I mean that definitely sounds fake but ok). It IS against the law to interfere with the delivery of that mail by not resealing it and returning it to a post office or postal carrier once you see it's not for you.

The opening-a-package laws don't seem to apply to private couriers at all, but it is still considered theft to keep the contents of a package not addressed to you--it's still a crime, just not the same crime.


That makes sense and I think that case would still make what this guy did as illegal. Since he knew obviously because he bragged about it. It's a different story to a company sending him an item by mistake since it was never addressed to him.
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LurkingWolf
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby LurkingWolf » Fri Jan 08, 2016 10:11 am

karla-chan wrote:That makes sense and I think that case would still make what this guy did as illegal. Since he knew obviously because he bragged about it. It's a different story to a company sending him an item by mistake since it was never addressed to him.


Yeah, it must come down to what name is on the package. There can't possibly be anything wrong with opening a package that some company sent to you at your address with your name on it, even if you weren't expecting it--otherwise the entire country would not have been drowned in a decade-long deluge of AOL CDs during the 90s, lol! I think that kind of situation is what mynickname meant.
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karla-chan
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby karla-chan » Fri Jan 08, 2016 10:16 am

LurkingWolf wrote:
karla-chan wrote:That makes sense and I think that case would still make what this guy did as illegal. Since he knew obviously because he bragged about it. It's a different story to a company sending him an item by mistake since it was never addressed to him.


Yeah, it must come down to what name is on the package. There can't possibly be anything wrong with opening a package that some company sent to you at your address with your name on it, even if you weren't expecting it--otherwise the entire country would not have been drowned in a decade-long deluge of AOL CDs during the 90s, lol! I think that kind of situation is what mynickname meant.


Yeah, it sounds very similar to our laws actually, because what matters is who it is addressed to. Since well companies can send out free samples, and if you have ordered a few things at once you might not know what is what either. However stating it is not illegal when it was addressed to someone else, seemed a little odd to me. Which is why I asked about it.

Since if that was the case, you could steal none tracked packages, claimed the where delivered to you by mistake and keep them?
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silvring
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby silvring » Fri Jan 08, 2016 10:34 am

LurkingWolf wrote:If I understand correctly, it is illegal in the US to open someone else's USPS mail intentionally, but we have a loophole that allows it not to be a crime if something was accidentally delivered to you and you opened it without realizing it wasn't for you (I mean that definitely sounds fake but ok). It IS against the law to interfere with the delivery of that mail by not resealing it and returning it to a post office or postal carrier once you see it's not for you.

The opening-a-package laws don't seem to apply to private couriers at all, but it is still considered theft to keep the contents of a package not addressed to you--it's still a crime, just not the same crime.

I actually almost had this happen to me a couple days ago- UPS brought an envelope to me that I was wasn't expecting. A red flag, but it's possible it was a job offer or insurance info. For whatever reason, probably not enough coffee or the poor lighting in the hall, I couldn't find the sender's name. Luckily I noticed it was for the next apartment down before opening it up to see what it was.
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Re: Mystery of the Missing Meng

Postby mynickname » Fri Jan 08, 2016 3:30 pm

This is how I understand the law where it's legal: http://www.ehow.com/about_6293417_feder ... -you_.html
And this is a slightly different interpretation where it isn't: http://thelawdictionary.org/article/wha ... ed-to-you/

They are both referencing the same USA law. The difference is how you interpret when a piece of mail is considered delivered or not. As I'm not a lawyer I don't know which is correct, but taking is different from opening. Since the guy took the dildo instead of just looking at it, then maybe it was simple stealing (compared to the federal mail crimes). But then would not opening the mail yet keeping it mean you aren't stealing because you didn't take anything? :psyduck: I think we can come to the conclusion that laws suck and we'll always have lawyers. :misc7:

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